© 2019 International Thinking Initiative

SOME OF OUR RECENT PAST EVENTS

Seminar

Protecting the Media in an Age of Terror

Date: 21 August 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh; Professor Peter Greste; Mr Richard Murray and Professor Katharine Gelber 

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

The future of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL)

Date: 28 August 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Dr Alan Davidson 

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

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IL

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DISCIPLINES

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IR

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International History 

Glenda Sluga (U. Sydney)

International Relations

Chris Reus-Smit (U. Queensland)

RELEVANT LINKS (open in new window)

Laureate Program in International History 

Glenda Sluga (Univ. of Sydney)

School of Political Science and International Studies

Chris Reus-Smit (Univ. of Queensland)

Seminar

Liberal Orders: Liberal War and Liberal Militarisation

Date: 11 September 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Federica Caso 

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Public Discussion

Polar Extremes

Date: 6 August 2019, 18:00-19:30

Speaker:  Prof Elizabeth Leane (Tasmania), Prof Tim Stephens (Sydney), Dr Rohan Howitt (Sydney) 

Place: Social Sciences Lecture Theatre 200, Social Sciences Building A02, The University of Sydney

The polar regions are increasingly at the centre of environmental, geo-political and cultural shifts occurring in the world. As experts warn that humans have only twelve years to take action to avert devastating and irreversible climate change, the poles have become a striking focus for observing and understanding environmental change. As ships plough new routes through their melting ice floes, the exploitation of the Polar regions present us with a changing theatre of geo-politics. The prospect of warming polar regions is generating fresh interest – and concern – about new industrial and military applications for the poles. At the same time the Antarctic Treaty System, a bundle of international agreements that regulate the Antarctic region, has taken on a new significance as a model for cooperative international action. Firmly-established images of the poles as pristine wilderness areas have been called into question, forcing humans to rethink their relationship to the Arctic and Antarctic through literature, media, and culture. This panel will discuss how our relationship with the polar regions has changed in the 21st century and what the polar regions reveal about the challenges facing the world today.

Public Discussion

Remembering 1919 and the origins of the International Economic Order

Date: 16 July  2019

Place: The University of Sydney, Australia

Speakers: Yves Rees (LaTrobe), Aditya Balsubramanian (ANU), Pierre Eichenberger (Lausanne/New School), Ben Huf (Sydney)

Chair: Glenda Sluga

On the anniversary of the peace of 1919, four young economic historians reflect on the lasting legacies of 1919 and put the challenges of the present in sharp relief. Our world in 2019 is very different from 1919. Empires have declined and new planetary threats in the form of climate change and infectious disease, and AI are shaping the future international order. There are eerie similarities, from economic inequality, to the uncertain status of the United States and Europe and struggles to accommodate a new power – now China. These are threatening isolationism, xenophobia and extremist nationalism. This symposium, discusses 1919’s legacies for economic nationalism, the economics profession, the role of international economic institutions and European integration today.

New Economic Thinking Winter School

Capitalism in Australia: New Histories for a Reimagined Future

Date: 13-17 July  2019

Place: The University of Sydney, Australia

Convened by Dr Benjamin Huf (Sydney) and Dr Anne Rees (La Trobe) with support from the Kathleen Fitzpatrick Laureate Research Fellowship in International History 

 

What is capitalism’s history? How do we write this chapter in our national and global pasts? And how can this historical knowledge inform our economic present and future? 

This July, budding historians are invited to consider these questions at a winter school intensive at the University of Sydney. Over three days, participants will engage with the recent revival in economic history and histories of capitalism and consider the role of economic and material analysis in their own research. 

Read more on the Winter School-flyer (opens in new window)

Seminar

Media civilizations: challenges to the international communication order

Date: 29 May 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: A/Prof Adrian Athique

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Date: 15 May 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Dr Heloise Weber

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Date: 15 May 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Dr Heloise Weber

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

Emergent phenomena in complex systems

Date: 1 May 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Professor Ross McKenzie

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

Emergent phenomena in complex systems

Date: 1 May 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Professor Ross McKenzie

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

From Where the Fine Warships Come: Democratic Athens at War

Date: 3 April 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: A/Prof David Pritchard

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

Listen to podcast

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

A Path to Syrian Accountability led by non-state actors: Extending the ‘system’ of international criminal law and the case of CIJA

Date: 17 April 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Dr Melinda Rankin

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar is part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Seminar

Beyond Transnational Criminal Law: Corruption as Global New Governance

Date: 20 March 2019, 12-1pm

Speaker: Dr Radha Ivory

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

This seminar was part of the "Futures of International Order" Seminar Series, convened by Associate Professor Jacinta O’Hagan, Associate Professor Sarah Percy & Professor Chris Reus-Smit at the University of Queensland. Visit the Seminar Series site

Workshop

Capitalism in Australia: New Histories for a Reimagined Future

Date: 29-30 November 2018

Place: La Trobe University's Melbourne CBD

Co-convenors: Dr Anne Rees, Ben Huf and Professor Glenda Sluga

The goal of this workshop is to give scholarly focus and urgency to this moment of economic transformation in an Australian context, energising historians towards a common, public cause. Encouraged by the successes of the ‘New Histories of Capitalism’ in the United States, and inspired by local scholarship engaging a ‘new materialism’, we seek to share expertise and ideas across fields and disciplines, and collaborate on the development of a prospective research program. We wish to explore ways to historicise the economic present so to better understand the politics, inequities and challenges of our collective future. Read programme (PDF)

PhD Forum

UQ International Relations Theory Forum 2018

Date: 15-16 November 2018

Place: University of Queensland, Australia

Visit website

This November the School of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS) at the University of Queensland conducted the second UQ International Relations Theory Forum. The initiative aimed to build a network of outstanding young Australian and New Zealand IR theorists. Highly innovative theoretical ideas were pioneered by emerging junior theorists, and the Theory Forum enabled them to connect with each other, air their evolving ideas, and get support and feedback from leading scholars in the field. Read more 

Workshop

The Rise of the International

Date: 27-28 August 2018

Venue: University of Queensland, Australia

2-day-workshop organised by Tim Dunne and Richard Devetak (University of Queensland) as part of their project 'The Rise of the International'. The general aim of this workshop was to bring together practitioners of the ‘historiographical turn’ (Bell) in IR and the ‘international turn’ (Sluga) in history to explore what can be learned at the intersection of international relations and history. The more specific aim was to try and capture the emergence and development of the thought, the relations and the systems that have come to be called international. Participants included Chris Reus-Smit and Glenda Sluga. 

Public Lecture

War and the Modern World

Speaker: Margaret MacMillan

Chair: Glenda Sluga

Date: 6 August 2018

Venue: General Lecture Theatre, University of Sydney, Australia

Wars have changed societies in many ways but changes in society have also affected the nature of war. In this lecture world-renowned Canadian historian Professor Margaret MacMillan examines some of the paradoxes of war, drawing on examples from history. Since it is a century since the end of the Great War, Professor MacMillan will pay particular attention to its causes and consequences. Listen to the podcast 

Public Lecture

America in Asia: An Australian Perspective

Speaker: Senator the Hon Penny Wong

Date: 18 July 2018

Co-Organiser: Laureate Program in International History, University of Sydney

On 18 July 2018, Senator the Hon Penny Wong gave a lecture on the role of the United States in Asia; the event was co-sponsored by the Laureate Programme in International History and the US Studies Centre at the University of Sydney.

 

International Conference

What is International History Now?

Date: 23-27 July 2018

Organiser: Laureate Program in International History, University of Sydney

International history has been around since the dawn of the discipline, defining History’s earliest aims, as the study of the primacy of foreign policy, or diplomacy. Yet in many parts of the world there are only a few historians who name themselves international, and few departments, courses, or chairs that announce this subfield. 

Speakers asked what international history has been, and what international history is now; addressed current developments in international history more broadly, and reflected on its geographic and geopolitical locations and limitations. more

Panel Discussion

​​The Past and Future of International Thinking?

Speakers: Anne Orford, Chris Reus-Smit, David Armitage, Patricia Owens

Chair: Glenda SLuga

Date and time: 23 July 2018, 6:30pm

Venue: Veterinary Science Conference Centre (Lecture Theatre 208, Webster), The University of Sydney, Camperdown (next to Oval No. 2, Ross St Entrance) 

​Organiser: Laureate Program in International History, University of Sydney

In an increasingly globalized world, nationalism is on the rise. International law, and international institutions, are in decline. How can scholars of history, politics, and law, help us understand the relevance of international thinking in the 21st century? In this public forum, world leading researchers in the history of international thinking spoke about the work they do, and what it can tell us about the world we live in. Listen to the podcast

International Conference

​​Humanitarianism and the Remaking of International Law: History, Ideology, Practice, Technology

Date: 30 May - 2 June 2018

Venue: University of Melbourne, Australia   

​Organiser: Laureate Program in International Law, University of Melbourne

This conference was convened by Professor Anne Orford, ARC Australian Laureate Fellow and Director of the Laureate Program in International Law, and Ms Anna Saunders, Senior Program Fellow with the Laureate Program in International Law. It brought together scholars working in law, history, international relations, and political theory to think critically about the ideology, institutions, practices, and technologies that condition modern humanitarianism and its relation to international law. more